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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 44  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 141-145

Initial experience on the use of real-time displayed radiation dose monitoring system in computed tomography fluoroscopy


Department of Radiology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY, USA

Correspondence Address:
Driss Raissi
800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY, USA
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/rpe.rpe_34_21

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This study presents our initial experience on the effective approach to apply real-time radiation dose monitoring during computed tomography (CT)-guided interventional procedures and the potential effects on overall radiation dose. A phantom study using multiple detectors at different body levels was conducted to determine badge positioning and possible effects on scatter radiation doses at three angles; parallel, perpendicular, and 45° relative to the CT gantry. A retrospective study was also conducted to compare scatter radiation and patient radiation doses during live CT fluoroscopy-guided procedures. Highest dose rates were observed when detector faced the scatter source in the perpendicular position to the gantry. There is no significant difference between wearing the detector at the shoulder or at the waist level. The use of real-time dose monitoring system provides immediate feedback during CT fluoroscopy procedures allowing for timely behavior modification.


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